Beckham Family Tree







Click here to get your own free online family tree
Powered by FamilyTreeGuide.com



Home


Log In


Register for a User Account


Advanced Search


Surnames


Photos


Histories & Documents


Cemeteries & Headstones


Reports


Sources


What's New


Statistics


Administration




Login

Search

Administration

LiveZilla Live Help

(Major) James BARBOUR

Home  Search  Individual  Pedigree  Descendancy  Relationship  Timeline  Login
Birth  26 Feb 1823  Catalpa, Culpeper Co., VA 
Sex  Male 
Died  29 Oct 1895  Clover Hill Plantation, Culpeper Co., VA 
Buried  Fairview Cemetery, Culpeper Co., VA 
Person ID  I7016  Default Tree 
Last Modified  22 Mar 2005 
 
Father  John Strode V BARBOUR, b. 8 Aug 1790 
Mother  Eliza A. BYRNE 
Group Sheet  F2799  Default Tree 
 
Family 1  Fanny Thomas BECKHAM, b. 15 Jun 1833, Ashland Plantation, Culpeper, Co., VA 
Married  1 Sep 1857 
Children 
>1. Ella B BARBOUR, b. 27 Feb 1858, VA
>2. Mary B BARBOUR, b. 1860, VA
 3. James Byrne BARBOUR, b. 1864, VA
 4. John Strode BARBOUR, b. 10 Aug 1866, Beauregard, Culpeper Co., VA
 5. Edwin BARBOUR, b. 2 Jan 1868, VA
 6. A Floyd BARBOUR, b. Jul 1868, VA
>7. Fanny C BARBOUR, b. Jan 1874, VA
Group Sheet  F2796  Default Tree 
 
Notes  He died of pneumonia

James Barbour was a well known lawyer and politician, and a brother of the Honorable John S Barbour, of the United States Senate. He attended Georgetown College from Sep to Dec 1840 and spent the year 1841-42 at the University of Virginia. He studied law under John Tayloe Lomax in Fredericksburg and in 1844 was admitted to the bar. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1849. He was a member of the Convention of 1850-1851 and member of the Convention of 1861. He entered politics in Aug 1850 as a successful Democratic Party candidate for the state constitutional convention from the district comprising Culpeper, Greene, Madison, and Orange Counties, VA. He was appointed to the crucial Committee on the Basis of Apportionment of Representation. He represented Culpeper County, VA in the House of Delegates in 1852 and 1853 and again from 1857 to 1863. From 1853 to 1855 he served on the board of visitors of the Virginia Military Institute. He was a delegate to the Democratic national convention in 1860 and attended its April and June sessions held respectively in Charleston, SC and Baltimore, MD.

James Barbour helped Governor John Letcher draft a proposal that a national peace conference meet in Washington. He worked behind the scenes in Washington with Republican senator William H Seward and Democratic senator Stephen A Douglas to fashion a compromise to avert civil war. Seward recommended James Barbour for a seat in Abraham Lincoln=s cabinet. Barbour was committe4d to guarantees of Southerners= unlimited rights to own slaves, rejected all proposals to use coercion to hold seceding states in the Union, and soon realized that no compromise between his position and that of the Republican leaders was possible. He voted for secession in the Virginia convention on 4 April, when the motion was defeated and on 17 April 1861, when it passed.

James Barbour was a veteran of the Civil War. He entered Confederate service on 28 April 1862 as a Major and assistant adjutant general on the staff of General Richard Ewell. Ill health forced him to retire from the service on 30 Jan 1863.

After the war James Barbour acquired a controlling interest in the Richmond Daily Enquier and Examiner on 15 Jul 1867 and owned the influential newspaper until 30 Jan 1870. He reentered politics after Reconstruction ended in 1870 and came out a year later against Governor Gilbert Carlton Walker and the controversial Funding Act of 1871. He failed in a campaign as an independent against Eppa Hunton for the House of Representatives in November 1874, but he won back his old seat in the House of Delegates in the Virginia Legislature in 1877 and served for two years. In 1881 he was nominated for lieutenant governor by the opposition Funder Party. He lost in the November election. In 1885, he successfully ran for the House of Delegates once again and served until he retired form politics in 1888.
 
Home  Search  Individual  Pedigree  Descendancy  Relationship  Timeline  Login


Click here to get your own free online family tree
Powered by FamilyTreeGuide.com